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as president. that's a hair above the 51% that put him back in office in the november election. 61% say he's easy-going and likable. 55% say he can handle a crisis. 51% say he's a good commander in chief. while only 29% say that he works effectively with congress. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." one of president obama's first major challenges in his second term will be trying to get significant new gun control legislation through the congress, but can he do it? if the outrageous opposition coming from the right is any indication, the president has a major fight on his hands. the nra has labeled him an elitist hypocrite and called out his daughters who receive secret service protection. yesterday senator ted cruz accused the president of exploiting the murder of children to push through gun control legislation, and then there are the real nuts out there. a movement of people who say that the sandy hook tragedy was a hoax. the real purpose was to create a political environment to take away all our guns. the american public is largely on board with at least some of the pr
presidential overreach in second terms. we are very cautious about that. on the other hand, i didn't get re-elected just to bask in re-election. >> michael, he does not sound like he is going to be basking in much of anything other than -- >> no sign of it. >> the torrent of hate mail and support from some corners. i wonder on the eve of this inauguration whether -- what do you think of the to do list that the president has, and to put it in some context for us. we know he has limited -- a fairly limited amount of time to get this done. is this a little ambitious? is the roster too much? >> probably not, but you have to remember what his experience was at the beginning of the first term zoosh right. >> most presidents can come in and people will say what are your priorities and here's my list. obama had so many things coming at him from every single direction that this is in a way almost like a first term. a person coming in for the first time, you know, giving us a little bit of an idea of what he would like to do. sure. his list is much too ambitious. he knows that. most second term presidents, a
is apparently one party doesn't understand we had an election in november and they lost. which means that you move on and you let the president be the president of the united states. these guys still want to fight the old battles of 2012. >> but they're giving this extension now. >> a three-month extension. the white house should tell them to go shove it. you can't run a government three months at a time. you have to have a long-term planning. bad for the markets. bad for the country. bad for the economy. let's make clear, definitive decisions. you lost. let's come together and compromise. pass the debt ceiling and talk about spending cuts if that's what you want to talk about. >> i want to read what "the washington post" conservative columnist had to say about the republican strategy. here's what he said. he wrote, obama's post-election arrogance and intransigence can put you in a fighting mood. i sympathize. this is what he's telling the republicans but i'm tending toward the realist view. don't force the issue when you don't have the power s. that what we're seeing with the debt kreeling i
the will of the world. the 1800 election may have been the most important election in world history because it was the first time power had been peacefully transferred after an election and this great healing moment. i think this president feels the way roosevelt did in '37. >> well, of course, nobody believes thomas jefferson and john adams snuck out of town ahead of time because he didn't want to be there to witness his defeater making that speech. so it wasn't exactly a healthy time but second terms have been rough. if i were obama, i wouldn't be paying attention to either of those speeching. i would be paying attention to the man on whose holiday this inauguration falls. >> martin luther king. >> martin luther king, because that is really what can make obama stand out. it was what made people excited about him in the first inauguration was this moment in history. it's yet another moment in history, and it comes on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. >> it's interesting, he's going to be taking the oath on lincoln's bib
through they wonder why they bothered to get re-elected but i think president obama is in a position to put pressure on the congress because of the nature in which he won. he demonstrated there is now at the presidential level a pretty reliable consistent majority coalition that democrats have. and there's incentive for republicans to try to shake up this electoral alignment. and i think that gives him some leverage on several issues. guns to some extent. immigration even more so. >> and certainly we've seen a change in the president in the last few weeks. is this something that we can expect in the second term, do you think, overall, a more aggressive president obama? >> i think clearly. look what happened here. again, i go back to the election. democrats have often been con strained on some of these issues. guns is a perfect issue. we went over a decade where democrats didn't talk about the issue, largely by the fear of losing conservative white voters, blue collar voters, older voters. the president lost all those voters. he did badly with all of them and still won and he won 332
house. the group's tough-talking executives -- >> we face the most dangerous election of all of our lifetimes. >> reporter: to its legendary past president, the late charlton heston. >> from my cold dead hands! >> reporter: the nra's influence has few rivals. but it wasn't always that way. the group got its start after the civil war as a firearms training organization. >> the nra began with humble origins, started by two former union soldiers after the civil war. they wanted an organization to help american soldiers learn how to shoot and american civilians who would be the next round of soldiers to learn how to shoot accurately. >> reporter: ucla law professor adam winkler says flash forward to the 1930s. voters cried out for new gun control laws in response to the bloody bank robberies of the great depression like those depicted in the film "public enemies." when fdr signed the national firearms act into law in 1934, one of the legislation's top backers was the nra. >> the nra was a strong supporter of gun control laws. >> reporter: in the 1970s, the group began lobbying in washin
governors after the election went to johnson and said, please stop sending this stuff to congress making us look too liberal to get re-elected. >> all right. michael, thank you very much. >> thanks. great to see you all, guys. >> all right. >>> next, what if anything can manti te'o learn when and if he finally comes clean from lance armstrong's confession, aka, how to not be a complete and utter loser? lance is next in the spin as we roll on. it's friday, january 18th. i didn't think it was anything. i had pain in my abdomen... it just wouldn't go away. i was spotting, but i had already gone through menopause. these symptoms may be nothing... but they could be early warning signs of a gynecologic cancer, such as cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer. feeling bloated for no reason. that's what i remember. seeing my doctor probably saved my life. warning signs are not the same for everyone. if you think something's wrong... see your doctor. ask about gynecologic cancer. and get the inside knowledge. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was jus
wants to get re-elected governor. i think he's ensuring he will get re-elected governor, but this is one of the reasons i can't see chris christie being anywhere near being the nominee for the republican party for president. >> i think he's running for president but as the democratic nominee. >> he will never make it through the republican primary. >> viewers of msnbc, if they've watched the shows the past few days, know i have kept asking for any republican in an elected leadership position to say something about the craziness and excessive rhetoric on their side, and colin powell, i'm sorry, he doesn't count as a republican anymore. but chris christie, i will give him credit, he finally stepped up and said at least this nra ad is bad. but what about the guys calling for civil war, impeachment, attacking the president for being a king, imperial, rand paul. it's amazing the free run they're getting from the more responsible people, if they even exist, in the republican party. >> what's amazing to me is the president in his remarks with the vice president embraced the second amendment, ma
be done. the nra spends more money on new york state elections than anywhere else in the country. so this is another resounding defeat for the nra. just like the last round of congressional elections the boogie man of the nra that all of the congress members are responding to is no longer alive and well. >> john: kim tell me a bit about the march on washington that you're a part of and how people can learn more about it. >> we'll be cosponsoring the march in washington. it will be on january 26th. we have had a large following there. we'll have some great speakers. we just want to be known. president obama said after newtown, it is going to take regular folks to help us pass these laws and that's who we are. we're moms, dads, grandparents, with with grandparents -- we're here to be the grassroots organization. we're not going to stop until it's done. we're not scared. and actually, 94% of the nra members want background checks. >> john: they do. >> to me, it is not political. it is just common sense. >> john: common sense and democracy. is there a web site where people can learn more
people. that might be in the next election but as pressure builds, members of congress will act to --. martha: i guess what i'm asking for in terms of a plan, are you going to put forth something that says, we, the house republicans believe that this program should be cut, this agency should be cut, these are the spending cuts we would outline in order to offset the increase in the debt ceiling? we believe that there needs to be cuts and these are what they would be? are you going to do that? >> martha, we'll get together this weekend and we'll crunch all that out. i don't want to presume there is consensus there i might adhere to. i want to do that with my colleagues but we need to lay down the broad bright line, for me, it is this. when does this budget balance? we must have cuts to go along with any debt increase. they must be substantial. there must be a line. martha: you need to sell that idea to the american people with specifics and with a plan and say we're the house gop. here's what we would do. here are the programs we would cut in order to reach parity over the next f
at the 2012 election and ahead to the inauguration with the obama campaign's internet guru, harper reed. >> we basically built what amounted to an ad-tech company, but instead of targeting ads on the internet, of course we did that, we really maximized the targeting that's physical. what that means is we're not wasting anyone's time. >> brown: and we examine the fallout from tour de france champion lance armstrong's admission that he used performance enhancing drugs. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. anby contribionso yo pbs statn from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama called today for what amounts to a national awakening to stop gun deaths in america. he detailed an action plan, all the while acknowledging that the most far-reaching measures face tough going in congress. >> we can't put this off any longer. >> su
of those folks there is lost. that, the president won election. you could even go so far he won the right to raise taxes on the rich. he didn't get a pass, nor did washington get a pass on addressing underlying spending. it almost seemedas if they're reading into the election that, and it worries me. should i be worried? >> you should be worried. more importantly the american people should be worried. when i watch the president's second term unfold, i feel like i'm watching an episode of laugh-in or "saturday night live." because, neil as you point out, every other day we hear from the credit rating agencies, that debt and spending is threatening the future of america and our credit rating and our ability to continue to lend money to the world, right? and we hear from corporate america. joe has just made the case for small business owners. and corporate america is sitting atop of almost $2 trillion in cash, because everybody is afraid. they don't know where this train wreck of a second administration is going. and back to the president. he sat there in fiscal cliff negotiations with speak
, michelle. >>> there once was a name barack whose re-election came as a shock, he raised taxes i pay and then turned marriage gay and now he's coming after your glock. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs morning news." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. on the morning after a very long inauguration day. >> that's right, d.c. police say more than 800,000 people came to the national mall to see president obama's swearing in. thousands of them stayed around to join the president for the inaugural parties last night, bill plante is at the white house. bill good morning. >> reporter: good morning, and good morning out west. the first event on this morning after happens in this hour the president and vice president and their wives attend the national prayer service. last night, the east room of the white house was the place for the hottest afterparty in town. entertainers like kelly clarkson and john legend, lots of politicians, friends of the president, all after the two official inaugural balls. >> my dance partner, michelle obama. >
or south dakota or louisiana who are up for re-election. they understand the political reality of this. >> so they want to see what sticks, more or less? >> that's right. and so if you put out a big list, something comes off the table, you can still succeed to a great degree. >> public opinion obviously is a big question here. >> oh, yeah. >> and it sort of shifted over the past few weeks. however, that's going to be what drives how much the president can do, perhaps? >> it sure does. and i was on the phone with a democratic pollster who was in touch with members of congress all the time. what he said to me is what they are seeing, sure, the national polls show that more people favor gun control than don't. that may always have been the case, even before newtown. but they are seeing a shift in intensity. the intensity has always been on the side of the national rifle association, the voters who come out and vote on a single issue particular flee a midterm election, particularly what we're coming tochlt he says what they are now seeing and they are hoping for is an intensity, maybe equi
. the president, since the election, has talked to 50 ceos and other business leaders. they've had 300 small business leaders come into the white house. this is all part of valerie jarrett's empire. she says she'll be doing more of that in the days ahead to get both immigration and a gun-control package passed this year. >> mike, always interesting in any two-term presidency, who stays all eight years at the staff level? what's your prediction? will valerie still till the end? >> she will. we asked her about the post-presidency. she joked she hopes the president will spend a lot of time in hawaii, that she'll probably go back to chicago. she also said that in the next few -- she also said in the president's inaugural address, he's going to take a hopeful tone and he's going to talk to every citizen about the role that they have to play in the agenda that he has for the next couple years. >> boy, that's going to take a lot of time, talk to every citizen. >> not just the 53%. >> mike allen, thanks very much. >>> still ahead, chuck todd, eugene robinson and david gregory, and we're going to be
is that when you see that 71% of almost 12 million voters the last elections, voted for one political party, and that group that voted 71% for one political party, is the fastest growing group in the country. already 50.5 million strong. 18 years of age equals voting age. if they think they can ignore the concerns of a large portion of this country or simply use words like am midwesty, i can't even deal with talking about it, then they'll got something coming. they may become the minority party for generations to come, and i'm not sure that any politician that sits down worrying about their future really thinks they want to be a part of a party that has no shot at national office because of something they could today choose not to do. >> you know, bringing to us our panel many new york here. steve, one of the things -- frank luntz had an op ed in the washington post with lots of tips, if you will, for the republican party. one of the things he says is you can't tell people to self-deport. they are not asking for open borders or blanket amnesty. they just don't want to be regard as criminals
to be one of the least-effective in this cycle. you have people like tim kaine easily winning elections in the state like virginia taking on the n.r.a. and you have michael bloomberg spending money on this and defeating a-rated n.r.a. candidates. so the whole calculus has changed. it used to be the n.r.a. was the one game in town on the money front and the pac front. that's changed. so there's a real cost now for standing with the n.r.a. and i that is as you would say a game changer in that regard. >> brown: dr. gold, how does it change your world? the evolving politics here and events like newtown? >> well, it's -- you know, from my perspective-- and i'm not a gun expert, obviously-- but from my perspective it's really unfortunate that it takes these kinds of events to move forward with our country to make a stronger commitment to providing for mental health care needs of our citizens. it shouldn't have to take something like this for something to become a social priority. >> brown: but now that it's here, as you were saying before, there's still going to be many, many questions about
the election. just real quick, rosen, you have seen that change? >> yeah. and i think the nomination of chuck hagel shows it. >> bill: okay. now, cammeron, you have some inside stuff on the gun control battle. go. >> yeah. we're sort of looking past the inaugural into what happens after that the president is going to go right back to the campaign trail. lots of the same sort of pomp and circumstance out with the folks that we saw during the actual election year campaign. it will be about the gun agenda as well as immigration and climate change in the debt ceiling where the gun issue is concerned, we will see rallies and town halls and lots of big gun control type money on tv screens. on the other side of all of this the national rifle association is planning a big ad blitz on its own. first one on the web started in the last day or so. it busts the president for hypocrisy because is he skeptical about the idea of armed guards in schools while his kids go to a private school here in d.c. by the way the house and the hill both know that the president's proposed ban on semiautomatic rifles is di
of possibly re-electing you, will forgive you? do you expect widespread forgiveness? >> well, i mean, that's up to each individual to decide. what i do know is two things. one is there's an amazing reservoir of human grace out there. there's a reservoir of god's grace that each of us has to access ourselves as best we can. and what i have come to learn and this is perspective on all of these events, you know, a lot of people said, look, mark, i'm not going to judge you on your worst day any more than i judge you on your best day. what i'm going to do is take a look at the totality of where you came from in 20 years of politics and where you come from as a member of our community here for 52 years and i'm going to make judgments accordingly. that's all any of us can ask. forgiveness really is in the hands of the owner. it's incumbent upon each of us to make that decision for ourselves. >> you're fighting in an old stomping ground of yours. it's a seat vacated by tim scott, who was appointed to senate last year by governor nikki haley. it's going to be a bit of a tough battle. you have good
. >> my colleague and i went to chicago. this was in the midst of the election and picked up opposition research prepared by jack ryan, obama's onetime republican senate point. he found all this information. the way he frames it, and i think it's probably right, is that obama was always very soft on crime but very tough on guns. every time obama had a crime vote to take when he was in the illinois state senate, he always voted "present" because he didn't want to -- for two reasons. one, he said that criminal law disproportionately affected african-americans. he saw a racial component there. additionally, he said i don't want to clog the court system with all these cases. what do you want to clog the court system with? we thought given his rhetoric on guns lately it would be interesting to bring up this vote where he said i don't want to give tougher prosecution to children who shoot in schools. >>steve: you look at chicago, one of the murder capitals of the world. nothing the president proposed the other day would crack down on handgun violence in chicago. there is one other thing we wa
party tick harputleo, in pat lehman in kansas in the presidential election compared paul ripe or mitt romney or nikki haley to nazis. all of them. it's commonplace. >> eric: schieffer, should he use the comparison? >> dana: it doesn't make sense anyway. people in hollywood didn't say anything because they agree or they think they can slot in the sunday show slot when bob schieffer retires. >> greg: how you can call the nra thug when that is their job, it's obvious. the national life association. you don't like guns; therefore, you don't like them. you can't call them thugs when they aren't going out to shoot people. they are real thugs. there are 500 murders in chicago. four times the murder rate in philly. who is doing that? thugs with handguns that all liberals ne never talk about. >> bob: who is holding you accountable for defending the nra? dabs he holds himself accountable. >> bob: that is a joke. i consider defending nra as people defending hitler. >> greg: so you say a guy that killed 6 million jews and the second amendment are the same thing. >> bob: not at all. not at all. if
, and that's because he doesn't have to worry about re-election anymore? >> reporter: it's because he doesn't have to worry about re-elected. it's because he feels he's won the last two or three fights, and he has. including the raising of the income taxes and, of course, the delaying of the debt, another three months before they have to vote on that again, so he's feeling pretty good. he feels he has the republicans on a limb. i think you're right. he did speak with a little bit more of an attitude, if you will, today. not too much but a little bit more. he's trying to tell people, look, we're going to get out there and pound the pavement on what we think is important and we're counting on you, you the public, the voters, to get your members of congress in line with us. it was in that sense a bit of a campaign speech along with this all inclusive remembrance of what the inauguration is like. >> a dapper larry gerston. the night is young for you in washington. enjoy it. it was a remarkable day from the fashion to the parades and of course you can watch all of the festivities right on our we
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 108 (some duplicates have been removed)

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